Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

John Harvard's Journal

University People

5.1.00

The care and nurturing of the 3,100 students and 2,200 scholars who come from abroad to study, teach, or hold fellowships at Harvard annually are now in new hands. Sharon R. Ladd became director of the International Office March 1. In that position, she oversees a staff who attend to visitors' visas and U.S. income-tax questions, and offer orientations, social events, publications, language training, and more. Ladd has worked in the office since 1972, most recently as associate director. She succeeds Seamus P. Malin, who retired to devote more time to broadcasting, soccer, and furthering peace in his native Ireland. Beyond her long experience, Ladd brings to the office a personal perspective on international issues: her spouse, Harold Bolitho, is a native of Australia and professor of Japanese history at Harvard. In keeping with their interests, Ladd, Bolitho, and their son will accompany an Alumni Association trip to the Far East in June.

Ladd.Sharon

KRIS SNIBBE/ HARVARD NEWS OFFICE

 

Engineering Ranks Renewed

As the Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences races to augment its research programs, course offerings, and facilities, Dean Venkatesh Narayanamurti has quietly recruited 10 new faculty members. Although they represent little net growth in the faculty ranks--a continuing high priority--the rush of hirings at least fills existing DEAS vacancies caused by retirements, deaths, and departures from Harvard in recent years. The newcomers over the past 18 months include: Ana P. Barros, associate professor of environmental engineering; Lene V. Hau, McKay professor of applied physics and professor of physics; Scot T. Martin, associate professor of environmental
chemistry; Igor Mezic, associate professor of mechanical engineering; Michael D. Mitzenmacher, Avrom J. Pfe!=er, and Norman Ramsey, all assistant professors of computer science; Garrett S. Stanley, assistant professor of biomedical engineering; Joost J. Vlassak, assistant professor of materials engineering; and David A. Weitz, McKay professor of applied physics and professor of physics. In addition, Charles M. Marcus, professor of physics, has based his research group in a DEAS laboratory.

 Narayanamurti_Venkatesh

Venkatesh Narayanamurti

Rose Lincoln/HARVARD NEWS OFFICE

Music Maker

This year's Harvard Arts Medal will be conferred on John H. Harbison '60, Jf '68, on May 6, during the annual Arts First festival. A prolific composer, Harbison has been a member of the MIT faculty since 1968. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1987, and most recently wrote the score and libretto for the opera The Great Gatsby, which premiered in New York City in January.

Harbison_John_ARTS

John H. Harbison

HARVARD NEWS OFFICE

 

Energetic Environmentalist

This year's recipient of the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement is John P. Holdren, Heinz professor of environmental policy at the Kennedy School of Government. The prize, which carries a $200,000 award, recognizes Holdren's work on nuclear materials, climate change, and sustainable energy supplies and strategies.

 

 

Mathematician of Merit

Raoul Bott, Graustein research professor of mathematics and the former master of Dunster House, is co-winner of the Wolf Foundation Prize in Mathematics. He was cited for his work on problems in top0logy, differential geometry, and the application of geometry to physics.

Bott_Raoul

Raoul Bott

JANE REED/HARVARD NEWS OFFICE