Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

January-February 2006

Letters

Undertreating Chronic Pain Kathleen Koman’s article about pain (“The Science of Hurt,” November-December 2005, page 46)...

The College Pump

“Your wooden arm you hold outstretched to shake with passers-by.” Benjamin Franklin’s father thought of sending his boy...

Treasure

Hiram S. Hunn ’21 came to Cambridge in 1931 to celebrate his tenth reunion. In Harvard Yard he discovered workmen razing Appleton Chapel...

In this Issue

Illustration by John S. Dykes

During the past generation, the American middle-class family that once could count on hard work and fair play to keep itself financially secure...

His apparent age in this undated image suggests that Williston has posed with the draft manuscript or the notes for his great treatise on contracts.

Photograph courtesy of Art & Visual Materials, Special Collections Department, Harvard Law School Library

When Samuel Williston, A.B. 1882, LL.B.-A.M. ’88, died at the age of 101, Time magazine took notice, describing his enormous influence on...

Illustration by Stuart Bradford

How did Franklin Delano Roosevelt ’04, born in 1882 to a privileged, aristocratic life in New York’s Hudson River Valley, become a...

Images courtesy of the Harvard University Art Museums In Manhattan in 1958, the year he graduated from Princeton, Frank Stella assembled the...

Steve Cappiello, his life changed by “a hunk of plastic,” and student Patrick Codd.

Portrait by Mark Ostow

With portaits by Mark Ostow In a room where somber faces are the norm, Steve Cappiello is beaming. The tall, muscular 36-year-old points to...

Letters

Undertreating Chronic Pain Kathleen Koman’s article about pain (“The Science of Hurt,” November-December 2005, page 46)...

Right Now

Illustration by Tom Mosser

Imagine that the Labor Department releases new statistics that show the U.S. unemployment rate rising from 6.1 to 6.3 percent. One major...

Photograph by Ricki Rosen/Corbis

Humans have a natural propensity to distrust the “other.” The classic social-psychology experiment in which individuals are randomly...

Fast forward a decade and imagine what a drugstore shelf might hold. A pill containing an entire day’s nutrients? A gadget that confers...

Floodwaters engulf a residential neighborhood in New Orleans after the levee holding Lake Pontchartrian broke in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Photograph by the Associated Press

In the immediate wake of Hurricane Katrina, President Bush promised to “do what it takes” to help New Orleans’s residents...

New England Regional

Owners-chefs Mark Gaier and Clark Frasier in the garden

Portrait courtesy of Garrett Scholes

Arrows sits on a wooded country road about half a mile from the coastal town of Ogunquit. Eighty percent of the food served is grown in gardens...

Conquer the winter blues by exploring the assortment of activities happening in and outside of Harvard Square, ranging from love stories...

Eating New England: A Food Lover’s Guide to Eating Locally, cowritten by Juliette Rogers ’94, is really a book of stories about...

• Beal House Inn, Littleton, New Hampshire. 603-444-2661; www.bealhouseinn.com. A single-malt-scotch dinner; seasonal five-course wine...

John Harvard's Journal

Swashbuckling siblings: Harvard fencers Emily Cross '08 and her brother, Sam Cross '07, look on as two teammates spar.

Photograph by Jim Harrison

To see her on the fencing strip is to witness an almost terrifying release of aggression. With lightning speed, a blur of lunges, parries, and...

More than a name and face will change at Harvard Management Company (HMC), the investment organization for the University’s endowment...

Marc Shell Photograph by Stu Rosner Marc Shell is Babbitt professor of comparative literature, a professor of English, a MacArthur...

The College curriculum of the future has begun to come into focus, as the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) this autumn started to discuss...

“Why should all of the creative and liberating ideas for liberal education be left to the small residential liberal arts colleges?&rdquo...

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences is in the throes of a major, multipurpose building boom, as shown in these autumn images. The site of...

Since 2001, College students’ international experiences during their Harvard years—formal study abroad, research, work or public...

In West Africa, Neba Solo, born Souleymane Traoré in 1969, is often called “the genius of the balafon,” says Ingrid T...

A room in the Holyoke Center Arcade has been fitted out to help Harvard planners communicate the University’s aspirations for an Allston...

When she became dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) last July, it was something of a homecoming for Theda Skocpol, Thomas...

President Lawrence H. Summers e-mailed a multi-thousand-word “letter to the community” on November 7, subsequently published as a...

Illustration by Mark Steele

1911 Because more seniors wish to room in the Yard, the Corporation is likely to furnish the south entry of Thayer Hall with steam heat and...

From 603 full, associate, and assistant professors in 1999, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) has grown to 700 as of this January—its...

In November 1945, the International Military Tribunal began its prosecution of Nazi war criminals in Nuremberg, Germany. Nuremberg and...

On a warm November evening, more than a decade after a study committee first envisioned it, the completed Center for Government and...

“When you think about events like Hurricane Katrina, the earthquake in Pakistan and other parts of South Asia, climate change, global...

Although the Harvard-Yenching Institute is housed on Divinity Avenue, at the eastern boundary of the University’s Cambridge campus...

Another Nobelist Thomas C. Schelling University of Maryland Joining Mallinckrodt professor of physics Roy J. Glauber ’45, Ph.D...

Knock on the door. Wait. Insert key, turn. Open slightly. “Dorm Crew." No one is home. This is a relief, as always. I locate the...

From the dawn of the twenty-first century until last fall, the football squads of Pennsylvania and Harvard ruled the Ivy League roost. Harvard...

Alumni

Viola Canales

Courtesy of Viola Canales

Viola Canales ’79, J.D. ’89, grew up in a close-knit, highly religious community in the south Texas border town of McAllen, when it...

The Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, part of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, is creating a record of...

Walter Seward, LL.B. ’24, turned 109 in October, making him the oldest living—and longest lived—Harvard alumnus known. He was...

Harvard clubs offer a variety of social and intellectual gatherings. Following is a list of University-affiliated speakers appearing at local...

The University’s on-line learning initiative has released one new segment that offers highlights from the student-run “International...

Crimson Compass, a new on-line alumni career network developed by the HAA to replace Professional Connection, is available for free to all...

“Harvard in the Olympics,” an alumni college offered by the HAA and the Harvard Varsity Club, features alumni discussing their...

To walk into the rambling, 1849 Greek Revival farmhouse at Sunday Farm in Middlefield, Massachusetts, is to enter an earlier century. On a cold...

After almost three years of attentive service to alumni in general as Harvard Magazine’s class-notes editor, Lisa Rotondo Hampton...

The College Pump

“Your wooden arm you hold outstretched to shake with passers-by.” Benjamin Franklin’s father thought of sending his boy...

Treasure

Hiram S. Hunn ’21 came to Cambridge in 1931 to celebrate his tenth reunion. In Harvard Yard he discovered workmen razing Appleton Chapel...