Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

November-December 2005

Letters

SO YOU WANT TO BE 120 Is aging necessary? (“The Aging Enigma,” by Jonathan Shaw, September-October, page 46). You bet it is...

The College Pump

"Your wooden arm you hold outstretched to shake with passers-by." “Does Harvard ‘brand’ matter...

Treasure

A bust of Werner Jaeger (1888-1961) presides over the common room of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C. He is...

In this Issue

Rhynchaea capensis

All drawings from The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, by Charles Darwin, in two volumes (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1871) unless otherwise noted. Scans of drawings courtesy of Kathleen Horton

Pellegrino University professor emeritus Edward O. Wilson, a scholarly giant of biodiversity and sociobiology, remains at heart a teacher. His...

Director Ross McElwee in a new screening room in Sever Hall. The projected image is from his autobiographical film Bright Leaves.

Portrait by Jim Harrison

In the Carpenter Center theater last May, a seminar-size class in “Filming Science” is scattered among the seats, waiting for an...

The 1892 Harvard football team. William Henry Lewis is in the white letter sweater.

Brief life of a football pioneer: 1868-1949

Illustration by James Steinberg

The Reverend Stephen Fulton falls a lot. Once he toppled into a freezer case at the grocery store. He has difficulty walking, and he can’t...

Letters

SO YOU WANT TO BE 120 Is aging necessary? (“The Aging Enigma,” by Jonathan Shaw, September-October, page 46). You bet it is...

Right Now

Retinal cells, even before sending messages to the brain, accent novel features like a running tiger and down-play stabe ones like grasses.

Photograph by Tom Brakefield/Corbis

If you “can’t see the forest for the trees,” you’ve focused too much on the details to take in the larger situation...

Vladimir A. Lukhtanov saw Agrodiaetus butterflies of several species flying together, and even though they all looked much the same in most...

Since the 1950s, the United States has led the world in science and technology, training an unrivaled pool of physicists, engineers, biologists...

New England Regional

Salts. There’s an artist in the kitchen and a crowd at the door.

Photograph courtesy of Salts

Success is making a bit of trouble for Gabriel Bremer and Analia Verolo. Two years ago they bought Salts, a popular bistro near Central Square...

The diverse array of activities offered in and around Harvard Square this winter ranges from Turkish films, holiday concerts, and stargazing to...

Robert Bunshaft ’39, M.B.A. ’41, and his wife, Doris, played tennis almost every day for 50 years. Now in their 80s, they still meet...

John Harvard's Journal

The new main stairwell at the heart of Baker Library separates the repainted but otherwise unchanged original north lobby from The Exchange (below), just inside the new south entrance.

Photograph by Jim Harrison

Baker Library at the Business School reopened officially on September 19 after a two-year makeover. The new facility was designed by Robert A.M...

Faster revenue growth, plus expenses rising at almost the same rate, yielded an operating surplus of $43.6 million for Harvard’s fiscal...

Donations to the University totaled $590 million in the fiscal year ended June 30 — the second highest sum in Harvard’s history...

Mallinckrodt professor of physics Roy J. Glauber ’45, Ph.D. ’49, has a new title: Nobel laureate. The Royal Swedish Academy of...

Ending his 15-year run as president of Harvard Management Company, Jack R. Meyer, M.B.A. ’69, and his investment colleagues turned in a...

Though the two official news releases announced the same agreement, their content diverged sharply regarding the settlement of a long-running...

Ronald Kessler Photograph by Stu Rosner In on-line biomedical databases, Ronald Kessler ranks as the most widely cited author in...

The campus discussion about faculty diversity—particularly the academic development and careers of women—that was launched last spring...

An undertaking greeted by Harvard librarians as potentially “a revolutionary new information-location tool” and “an important...

Data from an annually updated Harvard Business School case comparing 1949 and current-year graduates, by professors of business...

In response to Hurricane Katrina, Harvard College, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School of Education, and Harvard Law...

With a fiscal gun at the University’s head, Harvard Law School (HLS) has reversed its position on military recruiting on its campus. The...

Vice President’s Ciao Ann E. Berman Stephanie Mitchell / Harvard News Office Vice president for finance Ann E. Berman will...

Savaged by insects, ravaged by disease and old age, the elms of Harvard Yard were much diminished by 1990 (see photographs, below), when Michael...

At the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) meeting on September 27, its dean, William C. Kirby, said, “We begin this academic year having...

Illustration by Mark Steele

1915 Professor Theodore Richards becomes the first American to receive a Nobel Prize in chemistry. Illustration by Mark Steele 1930...

Like many stories, this one began at an improbable distance in space and time from where it ended. The saga of how the Harvard Review (see...

Founded in 1992, the Harvard Review (http://hcl.harvard.edu/harvardreview) is a biannual, 200-page literary journal that includes poetry...

Finding a FellowThe search for a new member of the Harvard Corporation—to fill the vacancy created by Conrad K. Harper’s resignation...

I wore the wrong shoes to my first day of work this summer. I don’t know what inspired me to choose the pointy black pair with elastic...

Alumni

Geoff Emblering stands among altars for burnt offerings in teh Haas and Schwartz Megiddo Gallery at the Oriental Institute Museum in Chicago.

Photograph by Dan Dry

In a glass case stand a dozen carved statues of gypsum alabaster — male figurines with their hands folded at their chests and their...

She Changes, by artist Janet Echelman ’87, is a giant multilayered mesh net suspended above a traffic circle next to a beachside promenade...

The Harvard Alumni Association awards were established in 1990 to recognize outstanding service to Harvard University through alumni activities...

University clubs offer a variety of social and intellectual gatherings. Following is a partial list of Harvard-affiliated speakers appearing at...

A group of 19 European Harvard club leaders gathered in Istanbul from September 9 to 11, along with HAA executive committee members and leaders...

Several college programs match students with paid and unpaid jobs and internships. To find out more about how alumni can provide these learning...

Upcoming Alumni Colleges include “Women in the War Zone” and “Harvard in the Olympics.” The events are organized by the...

A contributing editor of this magazine, John de Cuevas ’52, is an inveterate perpetrator of puzzles with cryptic clues, and 35 of his...

John A. Graham ’64’s conflict-resolution work has taken him from apartheid-torn South Africa to meetings in Geneva, Switzerland...

Ardent flight instructor, aerobatics competitor, and self-proclaimed space junkie James E. Smolen ’71, Ph.D. ’76, has a distinctive...

Douglas Brockmeyer ’82 comes in exactly where more risk-averse people head for safety. At work, he thrives as a pediatric neurosurgeon...

To assemble a collection of poems that capture the American experience yet are also accessible to children is a daunting task. That’s what...

The College Pump

"Your wooden arm you hold outstretched to shake with passers-by." “Does Harvard ‘brand’ matter...

Treasure

A bust of Werner Jaeger (1888-1961) presides over the common room of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C. He is...