Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898 | SUBSCRIBE

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Alumni

Centennial Medalists

July-August 2016

From left: John O’Malley, Cecilia Rouse, David Mumford, and Francis Fukuyama

Photograph by Tony Rinaldo/Graduate School of Arts and Sciences


From left: John O’Malley, Cecilia Rouse, David Mumford, and Francis Fukuyama

Photograph by Tony Rinaldo/Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Centennial Medal, first awarded in 1989 on the occasion of the school’s hundredth anniversary, honors alumni who have made contributions to society that emerged from their graduate studies. It is the highest honor the Graduate School bestows, and awardees include some of Harvard’s most accomplished alumni. The 2016 recipients, announced at a ceremony on May 25, are: Francis Fukuyama, Ph.D. ’81, a political scientist, political economist, and author; David Mumford ’57, Ph.D. ’61, a theoretical and applied mathematician who studies visual perception; John O’Malley, Ph.D. ’65, a priest, professor of theology, and historian of early modern Catholicism; and Cecilia Rouse ’86, Ph.D. ’92, an economist who served as adviser to two presidents and is now dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton. For more about the honorands, see harvardmag.com/centennial-16.

You Might Also Like:

Formal portrait of the Board of Editors for volume 70 of the “Harvard Law Review” (1956-1957), photographed on the steps of Austin Hall. The author, only the third woman admitted to Review membership, stands in the fourth row, at upper left.

The Board of Editors for volume 70 of the Harvard Law Review (1956-1957), immortalized on the steps of Austin Hall. The author, only the third woman admitted to Review membership, stands in the fourth row, at upper left.

Photograph courtesy of Nancy Boxley Tepper/reproduction by KLK Photography

The third woman to make the “Harvard Law Review” looks back

Portrait of Harvard Law School dean—and perfectionist—Ezra Thayer circa 1910, who found the school’s dire finances overwhelming.

As dean, the perfectionist Ezra Thayer, shown circa 1910, found the school’s dire finances overwhelming.

Public Domain

Review of Kimball and Coquillette, “The Intellectual Sword,” by Lincoln Caplan

A portrait of Eileen Connor and Toby Merrill of the Harvard Law School's Project on Predatory Student Lending

Eileen Connor (left) and Toby Merrill of the Harvard Law School's Project on Predatory Student Lending
Photograph courtesy of the Project on Predatory Student Lending

“Attacking the Concept of Debt”

You Might Also Like:

Formal portrait of the Board of Editors for volume 70 of the “Harvard Law Review” (1956-1957), photographed on the steps of Austin Hall. The author, only the third woman admitted to Review membership, stands in the fourth row, at upper left.

The Board of Editors for volume 70 of the Harvard Law Review (1956-1957), immortalized on the steps of Austin Hall. The author, only the third woman admitted to Review membership, stands in the fourth row, at upper left.

Photograph courtesy of Nancy Boxley Tepper/reproduction by KLK Photography

The third woman to make the “Harvard Law Review” looks back

Portrait of Harvard Law School dean—and perfectionist—Ezra Thayer circa 1910, who found the school’s dire finances overwhelming.

As dean, the perfectionist Ezra Thayer, shown circa 1910, found the school’s dire finances overwhelming.

Public Domain

Review of Kimball and Coquillette, “The Intellectual Sword,” by Lincoln Caplan

A portrait of Eileen Connor and Toby Merrill of the Harvard Law School's Project on Predatory Student Lending

Eileen Connor (left) and Toby Merrill of the Harvard Law School's Project on Predatory Student Lending
Photograph courtesy of the Project on Predatory Student Lending

“Attacking the Concept of Debt”