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John Harvard's Journal

Printer’s Mark

March-April 2013

1924

1924

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1925 and 1940

1925 and 1940

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1931

1931

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1931 and 1932

1931 and 1932

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1935

1935

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1936

1936

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1938

1938

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1949

1949

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1950

1950

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

1960

1960

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

New logo

New logo

Courtesy of Harvard University Press

New logo on book spine

New logo on book spine

Courtesy of Harvard University Press and Chermayeff & Geismar

Shielded Identity

For a hundred years, Harvard University Press appears to have had no logo it could call its own. When a designer fashioned a title page for a book, or stamping for its spine, or a catalog of forthcoming books, or a flyer promoting them, he or she appears to have turned to the type-specimen book of the Printing Office (the office itself closed in 2002) and used one of scores of Harvard shields found there. Sometimes indecision seized the designer, and one shield appeared on the spine and a different one on the title page. Shown here is a small sampling of the shields that have adorned Press publications. Sometime in the mid 1970s, the use of shields became infrequent, and a simple "Harvard" appeared on book spines, in this typeface or that. 

To help mark its centennial, the Press has adopted a new, cohesive visual identity. The logo takes the form of two vertical rows of three crimson rectangles, with the letter H visible in the negative space between the six rectangles. Sagi Haviv, partner at the design firm Chermayeff & Geismar, which worked with the Press to create the new look, said that it will be well suited for a variety of uses: "The new identity is simple enough that it will be effective both in traditional applications, such as book spines and title pages, and also in digital media such as app icons, browser icons, and e-books."

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Prince Shōtoku at Age Two, a thirteenth-century Japanese icon made of wood with inlaid quartz eyes

Image courtesy of the Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Partial and promised gift of Walter C. Sedgwick in memory of Ellery Sedgwick Sr. and Ellery Sedgwick Jr., 2019.122.

Harvard Art Museums Exhibition on Prince Shōtoku Icon

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Image courtesy of Amy Chu

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Click on arrow at right to see full statue and additional images
Prince Shōtoku at Age Two, a thirteenth-century Japanese icon made of wood with inlaid quartz eyes

Image courtesy of the Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Partial and promised gift of Walter C. Sedgwick in memory of Ellery Sedgwick Sr. and Ellery Sedgwick Jr., 2019.122.

Harvard Art Museums Exhibition on Prince Shōtoku Icon

Woman Running to Escape a Sudden Shower, c. 1765-70, by Suzuki Harunobu
Image courtesy of the Harvard Art Museums ©President and Fellows of Harvard College.

Japan on Paper, Harvard Art Museums