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John Harvard's Journal

Uncommon Space

September-October 2013


Photograph by Jim Harrison

The plaza between Harvard Yard and the Science Center has been remade as a campus crossroads. It features fixed and movable seating, anchors for reunion tents, wiring for movie nights and other performances, and a trilevel planting of ginkgo trees, sumacs, and ferns to soften the Science Center facade and provide shade and year-round visual interest. Chris Reed ’91 of Stoss Landscape Urbanism was the principal designer; for details, see “A ‘Common Space’ at Harvard’s Crossroads.”

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Prineha Narang (right), assistant professor of computational materials science, works with a student at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

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