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New Library Organization Launches

8.2.12

Loker Reading Room in Widener Library

Loker Reading Room in Widener Library

Photograph by Justin Ide/Harvard News Office

The new, leaner Harvard Library organization began operations on August 1. In January, protests had followed a town-hall meeting at which library workers learned of the possibility of an unspecified number of layoffs and internal job reassignments as part of the reorganization. Students later staged a sit-in at Lamont. In the end, library administrators announced, six staff members lost their jobs, while 65 opted to accept an early retirement package (almost a quarter of the 280 eligible individuals—those 55 or older with at least 10 years of Harvard service).

Those changes may be largely invisible to library users, unlike the new online Harvard Library portal—designed to improve access to information—that will launch in late August. Announced by Provost Alan Garber in a letter marking the transition to the new organizational structure, the portal is just one of numerous innovations under discussion, Garber reported. While noting that “change in any organization of this size and complexity is inherently difficult,” the provost expressed confidence that “the remarkable strengths of our libraries, and particularly the people who bring them to life, will allow us to build a Harvard Library that will set the standard now and in the future.”

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Click on arrow at right to view full image

A Gut Renovation for U.S. Labor Law

Native Americans cultivating a field

Written accounts of Native Americans cultivating the land in New England overstate the importance of agriculture in the pre-contact period, according to a new study. Here, an engraving by Theodor De Bry, after a drawing by Jacques Le Moyne, depicts Timucua Indians at Fort Caroline, a French settlement established in what is now Florida, hoeing and sowing seeds, including beans and maize. The image may be the only contemporaneous visual depiction by Europeans showing the importance of agriculture to Native Americans in the New World.

Courtesy of the Lewis Ansbacher Map Collection, permanently housed in the Morris Ansbacher Map Room, Jacksonville (Florida) Public Library.

Human impact on New England ecology was minimal before Europeans arrived

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Chart showing a scale balancing workers on one side against a big bag of money on the other

Click on arrow at right to view full image

A Gut Renovation for U.S. Labor Law

Native Americans cultivating a field

Written accounts of Native Americans cultivating the land in New England overstate the importance of agriculture in the pre-contact period, according to a new study. Here, an engraving by Theodor De Bry, after a drawing by Jacques Le Moyne, depicts Timucua Indians at Fort Caroline, a French settlement established in what is now Florida, hoeing and sowing seeds, including beans and maize. The image may be the only contemporaneous visual depiction by Europeans showing the importance of agriculture to Native Americans in the New World.

Courtesy of the Lewis Ansbacher Map Collection, permanently housed in the Morris Ansbacher Map Room, Jacksonville (Florida) Public Library.

Human impact on New England ecology was minimal before Europeans arrived