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Articles: Research

Illustration of human torso with affected organs highlighted

Illustration by Darrel Rees

Research

Researchers studying 95 million Medicare records find new fine-particle impacts in the blood, gut, skin, kidneys, and other organs.

2.7.20

The blue regions are oil palm plantation, while the forest regions (yellows and greens) are colored by tree height, which is a proxy for carbon.
Image courtesy of Global Airborne Observatory, ASU Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science.

The world needs tropical forests—but rainforest destruction continues unabated, and it may be even worse than you thought. 

4.1.20

Harvard Medical School Quad

Photograph courtesy of Harvard Medical School

As the novel coronavirus begins spreading in populations outside China, Harvard announces a collaboration with Chinese researchers to develop diagnostics and therapies for treating SARS-CoV-2.

2.23.20

Frank Hu holds a plate filled with food.

Click on arrow at right to view full image
Hu believes a plant-based diet can help feed a growing population in a healthy, sustainable way.
Photograph by Jim Harrison

Frank Hu confronts the triple threats of obesity, undernutrition, and climate change.

March-April 2020

A common plasticizer causes infertility, and fructose affects fat metabolism.

March-April 2020

Illustration of human torso with affected organs highlighted

Illustration by Darrel Rees

Researchers studying 95 million Medicare records find new fine-particle impacts in the blood, gut, skin, kidneys, and other organs.

March-April 2020

Curtis McMullen's prints hang in the Science Center lobby

Curtis McMullen's prints hang in the Science Center lobby. 
Photograph by Drew Pendergrass

A Harvard mathematician’s “interwoven tapestries” help make the infinite visible.

1.21.20

Native Americans cultivating a field

Written accounts of Native Americans cultivating the land in New England overstate the importance of agriculture in the pre-contact period, according to a new study. Here, an engraving by Theodor De Bry, after a drawing by Jacques Le Moyne, depicts Timucua Indians at Fort Caroline, a French settlement established in what is now Florida, hoeing and sowing seeds, including beans and maize. The image may be the only contemporaneous visual depiction by Europeans showing the importance of agriculture to Native Americans in the New World.

Courtesy of the Lewis Ansbacher Map Collection, permanently housed in the Morris Ansbacher Map Room, Jacksonville (Florida) Public Library.

Before Europeans arrived in New England, local ecology was driven by climate shifts, not by human interventions.

1.20.20

Red dots represent the Radcliffe Wave, superimposed here on an artist's rendering of the Milky Way as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope.

The clouds that make up the Radcliffe Wave (highlighted in red) pass within just 500 light years of our sun (yellow). Wave data has been superimposed on an artist’s rendering of the Milky Way galaxy as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope.

Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman, Harvard University

The massive “Radcliffe Wave” traces a new map of the sky.

1.7.20