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Articles: Research

Image shows a dendritic cell (shown in yellow) attached to a man-made polymer lattice inside a pill-sized implantable device.

Dendritic cells (like the one shown in yellow, within a pink polymer support structure) can be activated to recognize cancer cells. After migrating to the lymph nodes and spleen, they then train immune-system T cells to attack and destroy tumors.

Image courtesy of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Research

An implantable cancer vaccine shows promise in training the immune system to attack tumors.

12.7.20

Headshots of Marc Lipsitch, William Hanage, Barry Bloom

From left to right: Marc Lipsitch, William Hanage, Barry Bloom

Photograph credits from left: Kent Dayton and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (2)

Despite vaccines, Harvard scientists warn, more-transmissible variants make COVID-19 harder to control.

1.7.21

An aerial view (taken by a drone) of the south side of Harvard’s new science and engineering complex, in a perspective looking northwest toward the stadium

Click on arrow at right to view additional images
(1 of 10) The south side of Harvard’s new science and engineering complex, in a perspective looking northwest toward the stadium

Photograph by Steve Dunwell

A new center for engineering and applied sciences—finally

January-February 2021

A patient undergoes acupuncture of the belly

Photograph by Morofoto/iStock

“Fine-tuning” an ancient practice to heal, not harm

January-February 2021

Image shows a dendritic cell (shown in yellow) attached to a man-made polymer lattice inside a pill-sized implantable device.

Dendritic cells (like the one shown in yellow, within a pink polymer support structure) can be activated to recognize cancer cells. After migrating to the lymph nodes and spleen, they then train immune-system T cells to attack and destroy tumors.

Image courtesy of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University

An implantable cancer vaccine shows promise in training the immune system to attack tumors.

January-February 2021

Collage of Cover of Fevers, Feuds and Diamonds by Paul Farmer and a Headshot of Paul Farmer.

Cover of Fevers, Feuds and Diamonds by Paul Farmer and Photograph of Paul Farmer

Photograph of Paul Farmer by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Public Affairs and Communication

 

The 2014 epidemic was rooted in centuries of exploitation and war, Paul Farmer argues.

11.17.20

A family celebrates Thanksgiving as coronavirus circulates unseen in the air around them.

Indoor gatherings increase the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission.

Art by Niko Yaitanes/Harvard Magazine; images by iStock

Seasonality and SARS-CoV-2

10.27.20

Caroline Buckee headshot over an orange background.

Caroline Buckee

Anonymized location data can help guide strategies for protecting public health in a pandemic.

10.26.20

Headshot portraits of: Pardis Sabeti, Dan Barouch, Paul Ridker, David Liu, Xiaowei Zhuang, Marc Lipsitch.

Clockwise from top left: Pardis Sabeti, Dan Barouch, Paul Ridker, David Liu, Xiaowei Zhuang, Marc Lipsitch

Image collage by Niko Yaitanes/Harvard Magazine

More than a dozen Harvard faculty members are honored. 

10.22.20