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Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Articles: Arts

Illustration by Gaby D’Alessandro

Arts

The continuing appeal of novelist Rachel Ingalls

2.11.19

Michele Forman (center) and her students filmed at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama, for a project to raise awareness about the history of lynching.

Photograph by Kenzie Greer

Michele Forman ’93 offers her UAB film students technical competency and ethical context.

March-April 2019

Last year, ArtWeek featured “art in the dark” projections on Boston Common.

Photographs courtesy of ArtWeek

ArtWeek 2019 offers hundreds of events around Massachusetts

March-April 2019

Carpenter Center: home to Visual and Environmental Studies, soon to be Art, Film, and Visual Studies—a better name for the work done there

Photograph by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Public Affairs & Communications

Renaming Visual and Environmental Studies to signal a clearer focus on making art and film

2.5.19

Unite or Perish, Chicago (1968), by John Simmons 

Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Fund for the Acquisition of Photographs.2018.119

Eighteen photographers capture the 1930s through the 1980s.

November-December 2018

Robert Humphreville, a frequent Harvard Film Archive accompanist, says he’s mostly asked to play comedies, especially from “the big three”: Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, and Buster Keaton. (A scene from Keaton’s Sherlock Jr. appears over his shoulder.)

Photograph by Stu Rosner

Three pianists making silent film sing

July-August 2018

Wim Wenders speaking at Sanders Theatre on April 2

Photograph courtesy of the Mahindra Humanities Center 

Wim Wenders delivers the final installment in the 2018 Norton Lectures on Cinema. 

4.16.18

Agnès Varda

Photograph courtesy of the Mahindra Humanities Center

Agnès Varda delivered the second installment of this year’s Norton Lectures on Cinema.

3.6.18

Director David Wain (right) with Will Forte, who plays a young Doug Kenney ’68

Video still © Netflix

A new biopic, scripted by John Aboud ’95 and Michael Colton ’97, follows how Doug Kenney ’68 franchised fun, died young, and became a comedy legend.

2.13.18