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Letters

With Our Thanks

With appreciation to two Harvard Magazine artists

January-February 2019

We are honored to recognize two artists for their outstanding work on readers’ behalf during 2018, and to confer a $1,000 honorarium on each.


Robert Adam Mayer
Courtesy of Robert Adam Mayer 

New York-based photographer Robert Adam Mayer is a distinguished and sensitive portraitist—as amply demonstrated anew in his cover and interior images of black-studies scholar Fred Moten, for the January-February issue.


Phil Foster
Courtesy of Phil Foster

Phil Foster conceived vivid, compelling illustrations to drive home the importance of the arguments made by business and law professor Mihir A. Desai about the new federal tax law, in the May-June issue.

Our warmest thanks to these superb professionals.

~The Editors

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Native Americans cultivating a field

Written accounts of Native Americans cultivating the land in New England overstate the importance of agriculture in the pre-contact period, according to a new study. Here, an engraving by Theodor De Bry, after a drawing by Jacques Le Moyne, depicts Timucua Indians at Fort Caroline, a French settlement established in what is now Florida, hoeing and sowing seeds, including beans and maize. 

Courtesy of the Lewis Ansbacher Map Collection, permanently housed in the Morris Ansbacher Map Room, Jacksonville (Florida) Public Library.

Human impact on New England ecology was minimal before Europeans arrived

Photograph of Loeb House, Harvard University

Loeb House, where the Corporation and Board of Overseers conduct their University business
Photograph by Harvard Magazine/JC

Harvard Overseer election and divestment

Red dots represent the Radcliffe Wave, superimposed here on an artist's rendering of the Milky Way as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope.

The clouds that make up the Radcliffe Wave (highlighted in red) pass within just 500 light years of our sun (yellow). Wave data has been superimposed on an artist’s rendering of the Milky Way galaxy as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope.

Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman, Harvard University

Astronomers name interstellar “ripple” the “Radcliffe Wave”

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Native Americans cultivating a field

Written accounts of Native Americans cultivating the land in New England overstate the importance of agriculture in the pre-contact period, according to a new study. Here, an engraving by Theodor De Bry, after a drawing by Jacques Le Moyne, depicts Timucua Indians at Fort Caroline, a French settlement established in what is now Florida, hoeing and sowing seeds, including beans and maize. 

Courtesy of the Lewis Ansbacher Map Collection, permanently housed in the Morris Ansbacher Map Room, Jacksonville (Florida) Public Library.

Human impact on New England ecology was minimal before Europeans arrived

Photograph of Loeb House, Harvard University

Loeb House, where the Corporation and Board of Overseers conduct their University business
Photograph by Harvard Magazine/JC

Harvard Overseer election and divestment

Red dots represent the Radcliffe Wave, superimposed here on an artist's rendering of the Milky Way as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope.

The clouds that make up the Radcliffe Wave (highlighted in red) pass within just 500 light years of our sun (yellow). Wave data has been superimposed on an artist’s rendering of the Milky Way galaxy as it appears in a screen shot taken from WorldWide Telescope.

Image courtesy of Alyssa Goodman, Harvard University

Astronomers name interstellar “ripple” the “Radcliffe Wave”