Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898 | SUBSCRIBE

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Staff Pick

Capturing New England

July-August 2017

End of the Line, Cleveland Circle (2012), by Kate Sullivan

Courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum


End of the Line, Cleveland Circle (2012), by Kate Sullivan

Courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum

Moon Over Mt. Desert Island (2010), by Matt Brown ’81

Courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum


Moon Over Mt. Desert Island (2010), by Matt Brown ’81

Courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum

From skyscrapers to stormy seas, “New England on Paper,” at the Boston Athenaeum, offers 56 contemporary works. They reflect “responses to the region’s built, natural, and cultural environment,” says Catharina Slautterback, curator of the library’s 100,000 prints and photographs. Using the Japanese hanga technique, New Hampshire wood-block artist Matt Brown ’81 created Moon Over Mt. Desert Island (2010). Three impressions of the image hang as a triptych because Slautterback loves how, in “relating to one another, they show the passage of time.” All of the works were bought with help from a print fund for regional artists that honors Francis Hovey Howe ’52, Ed.M. ’73. (The art collector and Athenaeum member was also an early-childhood educator instrumental in forming Harvard’s first daycare centers.) Slautterback clearly seeks a diversity of styles. Eric Goldberg’s poignant etching Deep in the Valley (2006), pairs expansive Connecticut River valley farmlands with an intimate view of a woman reading a letter. Realist painter Kate Sullivan used pastel and watercolor in End of the Line, Cleveland Circle (2012). “It all results in a loud cheerfulness,” the artist wrote in the wall label, “and a distinctive sense of place.”

Harvard Squared

A guide to the arts and culture, history, cuisine, and natural beauty of Cambridge, Boston, and beyond

You Might Also Like:

A colorful Byzantine funerary tunic fragment depicts faces and vegetal patterns with a border of gemstones.

Photograph courtesy of Dumbarton Oaks

Byzantine Beauties

Hinton arranges materials for the Angela Davis exhibit with (from left) Radcliffe arts program manager Meg Rotzel, gallery coordinator Joe Zane, and Pforzheimer fellow Jackie Wang.

Hinton arranges materials for the Angela Davis exhibit with (from left) Radcliffe arts program manager Meg Rotzel, gallery coordinator Joe Zane, and Pforzheimer fellow Jackie Wang.
Photograph by Stu Rosner

"Angela Davis: Freed by the People" exhibit at Schlesinger Library

A child’s horse-drawn carriage from 1907

Click on arrow at right to view full image gallery
(1 of 6) A child’s horse-drawn carriage dating to1907, from the Wenham Museum’s new exhibit
Photograph courtesy of Peter G. Gwinn/Wenham Museum

Wenham Museum’s “Equestrian Histories”

You Might Also Like:

A colorful Byzantine funerary tunic fragment depicts faces and vegetal patterns with a border of gemstones.

Photograph courtesy of Dumbarton Oaks

Byzantine Beauties

Hinton arranges materials for the Angela Davis exhibit with (from left) Radcliffe arts program manager Meg Rotzel, gallery coordinator Joe Zane, and Pforzheimer fellow Jackie Wang.

Hinton arranges materials for the Angela Davis exhibit with (from left) Radcliffe arts program manager Meg Rotzel, gallery coordinator Joe Zane, and Pforzheimer fellow Jackie Wang.
Photograph by Stu Rosner

"Angela Davis: Freed by the People" exhibit at Schlesinger Library

A child’s horse-drawn carriage from 1907

Click on arrow at right to view full image gallery
(1 of 6) A child’s horse-drawn carriage dating to1907, from the Wenham Museum’s new exhibit
Photograph courtesy of Peter G. Gwinn/Wenham Museum

Wenham Museum’s “Equestrian Histories”