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John Harvard's Journal

Hoop Hopes

January-February 2015

Senior Wesley Saunders, easing in for a layup in the early- season loss to Holy Cross, led Harvard in scoring through the first six games, averaging 20.2 points per game.

Senior Wesley Saunders, easing in for a layup in the early- season loss to Holy Cross, led Harvard in scoring through the first six games, averaging 20.2 points per game.

Photograph by Steve Banineau

During the past four years, the Harvard men’s basketball team has been a model of consistency: four straight Ivy League championships, three consecutive trips to the National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament, and opening-round victories in the last two of those appearances.

But this year’s squad has been harder to figure out. After entering the season ranked twenty-fifth in the Associated Press national poll (the first time an Ivy League team has received such pre-season recognition since 1974), Harvard began its campaign by besting MIT (a Division III opponent) 73-52, but then tumbled to Holy Cross, 58-57. The margin of defeat was narrow, but the squad’s 24 turnovers and stagnation on offense were disturbing.

Four days later, when the Crimson retook the hardwood against Florida Atlantic, the squad again looked unfamiliar—but for a different reason. Head coach Tommy Amaker had benched all five starters to send a message that he expected every player to live up to the team’s internal “standards.” The move paid dividends. After Amaker reinserted his regular line-up several minutes into the game, Harvard unleashed a 34-9 run, en route to a 71-49 victory. The blowout began a three-game winning streak that culminated with a two-point win over the University of Massachusetts, Harvard’s toughest opponent to date.

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Sign up for Harvard Magazine’s basketball e-mail and follow the Crimson all season long! David L. Tannenwald ’08 will provide the latest news, game summaries, and insights as the Crimson chase another Ivy title and NCAA berth!

Will the team live up to its pre-season billing? The reaction to the squad’s early hiccup underscores the difficulty of what Amaker is trying to accomplish. He believes that his team can compete with the best in the country—but as the Crimson grows more successful, the margin for error narrows, and the target on its back grows bigger. If this year’s team is to sustain or exceed the consistency of past squads, it will need to be different: it will need to be better. A year-end road trip to Virginia and Arizona, and the beginning of league play in mid January, should quickly bring those prospects into focus.

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Just another hurdle: Leaping over guard Eric Wilson (68), Harvard running back Aaron Shampklin sails through a hole last season against Princeton. Shampklin had a breakout season in 2018, leading the Ivy League in rushing with 105.3 yards per game.
Photograph by Gil Talbot/Harvard Athletic Communications

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Linda Liedel (at left), representing Germany in Spain’s 2019 La Manga Tournament, competes for the ball with a Danish rival.

Liedel (at left), representing Germany in Spain’s 2019 La Manga Tournament, competes for the ball with a Danish rival.

Photograph by Quality Sports Images/Getty Images

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From the original cover in 1997: John Dockery ’66, the only alumnus to earn a Super Bowl ring (click the white arrow on the right to see full image), displays mementos of his varsity sport. Such three-letter men have given way to single-sport stars like Naomi Miller ’99, a striker on the women’s soccer team. Updated 6/26/19: In 2013, Matt Birk ’98 became the second alumnus to earn a Super Bowl ring, playing for the Baltimore Ravens.

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Harvard running back Aaron Shampklin hops over a Harvard teammate with a football in hand.

Just another hurdle: Leaping over guard Eric Wilson (68), Harvard running back Aaron Shampklin sails through a hole last season against Princeton. Shampklin had a breakout season in 2018, leading the Ivy League in rushing with 105.3 yards per game.
Photograph by Gil Talbot/Harvard Athletic Communications

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Linda Liedel (at left), representing Germany in Spain’s 2019 La Manga Tournament, competes for the ball with a Danish rival.

Liedel (at left), representing Germany in Spain’s 2019 La Manga Tournament, competes for the ball with a Danish rival.

Photograph by Quality Sports Images/Getty Images

Linda Liedel of Harvard women’s soccer

From the original cover in 1997: John Dockery ’66, the only alumnus to earn a Super Bowl ring (click the white arrow on the right to see full image), displays mementos of his varsity sport. Such three-letter men have given way to single-sport stars like Naomi Miller ’99, a striker on the women’s soccer team. Updated 6/26/19: In 2013, Matt Birk ’98 became the second alumnus to earn a Super Bowl ring, playing for the Baltimore Ravens.

The Professionalization of Ivy League Sports