Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

July-August 2012

Letters

Letters on E.O. Wilson, Senator Franken, dating data, Overseers, lecture lessons, softball, basketball, taxes, lilacs, and primate research

The College Pump

A World Palindrome Champion, a sleuthing architect, and Yo-Yo Ma on Leon Kirchner

Treasure

Mollusks of amazing diversity—some deadly—are on display at the Harvard Museum of Natural History.

In this Issue

Lawrence Lessig thinks American democracy requires a constitutional overhaul to counter the “economy of influence.”

Continuous campaigning and gridlocked governing in American politics

Voting rights and partisan practices in a highly contested election year

A bicentennial exhibition features the little-known, masterful animal artistry of Edward Lear.

Brief life of America’s greatest naval architect: 1886-1967

Letters

Letters on E.O. Wilson, Senator Franken, dating data, Overseers, lecture lessons, softball, basketball, taxes, lilacs, and primate research

Right Now

James Robinson says that in the modern period, greedy leaders and institutional corruption, rather than geography, explain why some nations fail.

An innovative course yields new products, services, and experiences that model the possible future of libraries.

Kathryn Edin of Harvard Kennedy School explains why more and more American children are born out of wedlock.

New England Regional

Downsizing gains popularity.

Tips for paring down and clearing out unwanted belongings

July-August 2012 calendar of events at Harvard

Review of Casa B restaurant in Union Square, Somerville

John Harvard's Journal

Moments for reflection and projection during the 361st Commencement, in Harvard's 375th anniversary year

The University confers honorary degrees on six men and two women.

An oratorical omnium gatherum, from Donald Berwick and Derek Bok to Margaret Marshall and Fareed Zakaria

Commencement moments and people—pleasing, surprising, and funny

Harvard partners with MIT to form edX, an ambitious online learning venture.

Meet the director of Harvard Medical School's new Center for Primary Care.

In a fiscally constrained era, faculty-administration tensions arise.

Paul Finnegan joins the Harvard Corporation, expanding its ranks to 11.

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences deploys new rules and procedures surrounding financial conflicts of interest.

Memorial Church's new minister, Pulitzer Prize winners, and other Harvardians in the news

Headlines from Harvard history

Shading the Yard, new digital Niemans, Brazil's Harvard commitment, and more

The Undergraduate considers the human cost of perfection.

The brothers O'Connor, from New Zealand, row on the Harvard varsity heavyweight crew.

Spring sports wrap-up

Montage

<i>Rocksteady</i>, a film directed by Mustapha Khan '84, explores the culture of stock car races.

Robert Proctor’s <i>Golden Holocaust</i> urges abolition of cigarettes, the leading preventable cause of death.

Recent books with Harvard connections

Composer Ben Cosgrove connects sound and place.

Video-game designer Scott Duquette ’05, a new kind of urban planner

A correspondence corner for not-so-famous lost words

Alumni

An entrepreneur’s multimedia ESPN for kids, “the next generation of sports fans”

Harvard’s senior members, at Commencement and elsewhere

Five honored for outstanding service to the University

Four women and eight men were chosen.

Four seniors are bound for Britain.

New records are announced on Commencement afternoon.

A literary scholar, an East Asia expert, a trailblazing biologist, and a specialist on international relations are honored.

A letter from President Drew Faust

Nick Volk ’53 champions affordable housing.

Kathy Perkins ’92 fosters science education.

Shared Interest Group happenings in July and August

Harvard alumni may sign in to view class notes and obituaries.

The College Pump

A World Palindrome Champion, a sleuthing architect, and Yo-Yo Ma on Leon Kirchner

Treasure

Mollusks of amazing diversity—some deadly—are on display at the Harvard Museum of Natural History.