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Articles: Research

Six butterflies shown in infrared wavelengths of purple and pink colors

(Click on arrow at right to see full image) Butterflies of six different species, photographed in infrared wavelengths, reveal patterns unseen in visible light.

Image courtesy of Naomi Pierce and Nanfang Yu

Research

A study reveals new dimensions to their function and beauty.

4.10.20

A yellow cab turns through an intersection directed by a police officer

Essential workers at highest risk of SARS-CoV-2  infection include cab drivers and police officers. 
Photograpy by iStock

Nearly half of early COVID-19 transmission was work-related—a cautionary note as the economy reopens.

5.19.20

Video split-screen capture of images of Evelynn Hammonds and Paul Farmer

Evelynn Hammonds and Paul Farmer

A conversation on health disparities, with Paul Farmer and Evelynn Hammonds

5.15.20

Art by Harvard Magazine/ JC; images by iStock

A critical scientific question that bears on policies for fighting the pandemic.

5.13.20

Screen shot of Mary T. Bassett and Khalil Gibran Muhammad

 Mary T. Bassett and Khalil Gibran Muhammad

A Radcliffe Institute online discussion of health disparities laid bare by coronavirus

 

4.29.20

From race and colonization to genetics and paleohistory, our favorite stories about the people reshaping the study of history

4.21.20

Photograph of downtown Yamhill, Oregon, with general store

(Click on arrow at right to see additonal images)
(1 of 3) Yamhill’s physical charm, complete with a general store, may make it easy to overlook its people’s struggles.

Photograph by Lynsey Addario

Americans diminished by “social poverty”

May-June 2020

Photograph of swimming hole cut in ice

© Mandarinkap/Dreamstime.com

The Business School’s Rebecca Henderson reimagines capitalism to save the planet.

May-June 2020

Photograph of surgical procedure

Americans use a lot of technologically sophisticated, expensive medical services—slighting more effective, routine care.

Photograph by Rui Vieira/PA Wire/AP Images

Administrative costs, greed, overutilization—can these drivers of U.S. medical costs be curbed?

May-June 2020