Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Your independent source for Harvard news since 1898

Research

Reinhart Named Professor at Kennedy School

7.6.12

Carmen M. Reinhart

Carmen M. Reinhart

Photograph courtesy of the Peterson Institute for International Economics

International finance expert Carmen M. Reinhart, coauthor with Cabot professor of public policy Kenneth Rogoff of This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly, has been named Zombanakis professor of the international financial system at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), effective July 1. Previously the Weatherstone Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, Reinhart formerly served as professor of economics and director of the Center for International Economics at the University of Maryland, and has also held positions at the International Monetary Fund. She has also been chief economist at investment bank Bear Stearns. She earned her doctorate from Columbia University.

HKS academic dean Iris Bohnet says that Reinhart “brings to the Kennedy School a profound and unique understanding of the world’s financial system at a time when the system is under severe stress. Her addition to the faculty will bolster the school’s research and teaching in the critical area of markets, business, and government.”

 

 

 

You Might Also Like:

Images by iStock and composed by Harvard Magazine/JC

Harvard Study Shows How Antibiotics Disrupt Babies’ Microbiomes

Anopheles gambiae is one of many mosquito species in the genus Anopheles that transmit malaria to humans. At least one species of Anopheles, when infected with Wolbachia bacteria, appears not to act as a vector of the malaria parasite. Photograph courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control

Bacteria Could Help Prevent Malaria, New Harvard Study Finds

You Might Also Like:

Images by iStock and composed by Harvard Magazine/JC

Harvard Study Shows How Antibiotics Disrupt Babies’ Microbiomes

Anopheles gambiae is one of many mosquito species in the genus Anopheles that transmit malaria to humans. At least one species of Anopheles, when infected with Wolbachia bacteria, appears not to act as a vector of the malaria parasite. Photograph courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control

Bacteria Could Help Prevent Malaria, New Harvard Study Finds